CARE Sanctuary Expansion to Help Most At-Risk Homeless Pets

Sweet Karma was one of hundreds of pit bull type dogs facing a grim fate at a Los Angeles County Shelter. Tiny Winston was an emaciated stray kitty doing his best to survive on the streets.Both their fortunes turned around after being rescued by CARE (Cat/Canine Assistance, Referral & Education) Sanctuary in Littlerock, CA in 2017.  

After several weeks at the veterinarian to treat upper respiratory infection, followed by a few weeks at CARE, Karma was adopted and today enjoys...

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Sweet Karma was one of hundreds of pit bull type dogs facing a grim fate at a Los Angeles County Shelter. Tiny Winston was an emaciated stray kitty doing his best to survive on the streets.Both their fortunes turned around after being rescued by CARE (Cat/Canine Assistance, Referral & Education) Sanctuary in Littlerock, CA in 2017.  

After several weeks at the veterinarian to treat upper respiratory infection, followed by a few weeks at CARE, Karma was adopted and today enjoys life as a member of a loving family. Winston, who was diagnosed with feline leukemia (FeLV – Feline Leukemia Virus), recovered in a special CARE room where cats like him receive lifetime care if not adopted. Luckily for Winston, he found a home with another FeLV cat.  

More pets like Karma and Winston will soon have a new lease on life, thanks to a major expansion underway at the CARE sanctuary. Currently home to 300 dogs and cats, the new buildings, currently under construction, will increase the shelter capacity from the current level to 600 or more.

“We are so excited to be able to double our lifesaving capabilities, as well as clear space at the shelters where the majority of our pets come from," said Maria Porter, Sanctuary Manager at CARE Sanctuary.  "The expansion is going to make a very positive impact for homeless pets in Los Angeles."

Founded in 1992 and funded entirely by private donations, CARE has rescued, re-homed or provided a lifelong safe haven for thousands of abandoned, abused, and neglected pets since its inception. Cats and dogs at CARE come from high-kill animal control facilities, as well as from rescue groups and individuals on a case-by-case basis. 

CARE only euthanizes in cases of terminal illness, while hard to place animals (aggressive dogs, unsocialized cats, elderly or disabled pets) spend their entire lives at the sanctuary, were they receive lifelong care.

"The support of our community is what allows CARE to save so many lives. We encourage animal lovers to help us save as many pets as possible by donating, volunteering, or adopting," said Mary Zupan, President of CARE.  "It's only by working together that we can get Los Angeles to become a no-kill city and a model for the rest of the country."

CARE is accepting donations for its facility expansion at  www.care4pets.org and https://www.facebook.com/ care4pets.org.  CARE’s PayPal account is [email protected]. All donations are tax deductible.  Donations can also be sent to P.O. Box 56631, Sherman Oaks, CA 91413.  CARE's adoptable dogs and cats can be viewed on www.petfinder.com.